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Proposed Italian Bill Will Make Wine a Part of Primary School Curriculum


Children from ages six to 13 will study wine culture and history for one hour each week

As an added benefit, supporters believe wine education will get more students interested in tourism and gastronomy.

Italians know their wines, and soon, their children will too. Dario Stefàno, a senator with the group Sinistra Ecologia Libertà (Left Ecology Freedom) has drafted a bill to do just that.

The bill, if passed, will add wine culture and history to the curriculum in primary schools, for children aged six to 13, reports Quartz.

Italy is the world’s largest producer of wine, and produced nearly five billion liters in 2015. Stefàno adds, “We have more vines than churches,” and makes the point that winemaking is “an integral cultural part of Mediterranean cultures” and provides 1.25 million jobs.

Educating children about wine might also get more students interested in careers in gastronomy or tourism. Tourism, which gives Italy more than €35 billion (about $39 billion USD), is “hardly encouraged among students.” Stefàno says, “Italy is now the biggest wine producer in the world, it is our history, and we should be happy and proud to teach our children about it,” quotes The Daily Mail.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


Winemaking at Home

Wine can be made from any material capable of growing yeast. This process of active yeast growth on foodstuff is called alcoholic fermentation. The yeast feeds on the fruit sugar and converts it into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. This process gradually depletes the sugar content as the percentage of alcohol increases. The distinct flavor and aroma of an individual wine comes from small quantities of other chemical substances produced during fermentation. In addition, the flavor and aroma are further enhanced by proper aging of the wine.

Fruits, berries and grapes readily support fermentation to produce wine. For this reason, they are the best sources to use in making wine. Many people, especially those having home fruit orchards, wild or cultivated grapes and berries growing on their property, have taken up home winemaking as a hobby. They have found it to be a challenging and rewarding diversion from the daily life routine.

This making of good quality wine involves more than just following granny’s recipes. Winemaking is a science and as such requires close attention to detail. Fermentation must be carefully controlled to avoid spoilage which renders the wine unpalatable. Cleanliness is essential in all phases of winemaking. If utensils are not thoroughly cleaned and sterilized, they may contaminate the wine. Ingredients, particularly the fruit, must be of high quality, free from decay and external contaminates.

The purpose in writing this bulletin is to provide essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information described here is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for those experienced amateurs who frequently run into difficulties and disappointments.


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